Former Millard-Hensley Elementary School — Salyersville, Kentucky

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The Millard-Hensley Elementary School building is located on US460 near the Licking River just north of the town of Salyersville in Magoffin County, Kentucky.

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The school closed it’s doors in 2009 after the new Magoffin North and Magoffin South Elementary Schools were completed.  At this time, five elementary schools were consolidated in to two.

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If I were guessing I would say this school was built in the 1960s or 1970s.  It has the typical flat roof of that era and the elongated windows from floor to ceiling.  The school seems to be in very good shape, and the grounds are secure.  The public doesn’t even have access to the parking lot as it is roped off.

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Apparently times were great at one point for this school and the enrollment was so large that mobile units were needed.

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The main entrance.

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school4Oh yeah, the building is for lease, if you are interested.

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I’m glad to see that so far, six years after its closure the building is holding up and hasnt fallen victim to vandals like so many others I have came across have.

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5 thoughts on “Former Millard-Hensley Elementary School — Salyersville, Kentucky”

  1. looking for 1991-1992 basketball videos of Millard Hensley the year they won championship game, basketball player Shawn L. Helton. Thankyou

  2. Hey there, was feeling nostalgic and went on a Google trip through time and wound up here on your page. I attended MHE in the mid-to-late ’90s. A few clarifications and answers vis-à-vis the questions you brought up.

    The school was built in 1963. The mobile units around the main building served two purposes: the one pictured above in front of the main building on the far right side was used as the “headstart”/pre-kindergarten program classroom. There used to be other mobile classroom units (perhaps they are still there?) behind the main building as well. Those were used after the November 1996 collapse of the outer wall in two sections of the main building. The walls collapsed inward without warning in two full classrooms, resulting in severe injury to two 6 year old (at the time) students. For the duration of the rest of that school year (’96-’97), mobile trailers were used as substitute classrooms. They were also used again several years later in 2000 when a large-scale asbestos-removal was undertaken inside the aging school building (during which classes remained in session, with unprotected students and faculty mingling in the halls with the HAZMAT-suited asbestos removers during school hours). The removal was never completed and large sections of the ceiling (especially in the gymnasium/cafeteria portion of the building) remain covered with asbestos. This accounts for the reason the building (and the acreage on which it sits) remains abandoned with no tenants occupying it at all since the school was closed almost a decade ago. It seems as well that the county has no plans with regard to the abandoned building other than to allow its continued fall into abject disrepair.

  3. [Hello there. I was not logged in earlier when I left this comment- sorry!]

    Hey there, was feeling nostalgic and went on a Google trip through time and wound up here on your page. I attended MHE in the mid-to-late ’90s. A few clarifications and answers vis-à-vis the questions you brought up.

    The school was built in 1963. The mobile units around the main building served two purposes: the one pictured above in front of the main building on the far right side was used as the “headstart”/pre-kindergarten program classroom. There used to be other mobile classroom units (perhaps they are still there?) behind the main building as well. Those were used after the November 1996 collapse of the outer wall in two sections of the main building. The walls collapsed inward without warning in two full classrooms, resulting in severe injury to two 6 year old (at the time) students. For the duration of the rest of that school year (’96-’97), mobile trailers were used as substitute classrooms. They were also used again several years later in 2000 when a large-scale asbestos-removal was undertaken inside the aging school building (during which classes remained in session, with unprotected students and faculty mingling in the halls with the HAZMAT-suited asbestos removers during school hours). The removal was never completed and large sections of the ceiling (especially in the gymnasium/cafeteria portion of the building) remain covered with asbestos. This accounts for the reason the building (and the acreage on which it sits) remains abandoned with no tenants occupying it at all since the school was closed almost a decade ago. It seems as well that the county has no plans with regard to the abandoned building other than to allow its continued fall into abject disrepair.

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