Former Hara Arena (1956-2016) — Trotwood, Ohio

Hara Arena was a 5,500-seat multi-purpose arena located in the Dayton, Ohio suburb of Trotwood. The facility began as a ballroom in 1956, added an arena in 1964 and eventually grew to a six-building complex.
Hara Arena -- Trotwood, Ohio Over the course of its 60 year history Hara has been home to many sports teams including the Dayton Jets basketball team and Dayton Gems (1964–1977, 1979–1980 and 2009–2012), Dayton Blue Hawks, Dayton Owls, Dayton Bombers, Dayton Ice Bandits, Dayton Demonz, and Dayton Demolition ice hockey teams and the Marshals indoor football team.  Hara Arena -- Trotwood, Ohio
The original plans did not include an ice rink, but were changed to accommodate the Dayton Gems who were looking for a home arena. By the end of its life in 2016, the complex spanned 165,000 square feet which includes the main arena, four exhibition halls, a conference center, a pub and a golf course.
Hara Arena -- Trotwood, Ohio
On July 29, 2016, it was announced that the facility would close after hosting a final event August 27, 2016 due to ongoing financial issues and a 20-year long legal fight over the unresolved estate of founder Harold Wampler. At the time of the closure announcement, the facility was said to have a $36 million annual impact to the area. The closure forced events, like the annual Dayton Hamvention, to search for an alternative venue. It also forced the Dayton Demolition ice hockey team to cease operations after only one season.
Hara Arena -- Trotwood, Ohio

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Shields High School Gym — Seymour, Indiana

P1000065 In November of 1937 construction began on a new gymnasium for the Seymour Indiana high school then known as Sheilds High School. The new gym was completed as a WPA project in 1938 and provided the high school and community with a modern, fire-proof gymnasium with a seating capacity of over 3,300. P1000066
The gymnasium continued to serve Shields High School until 1959, when the high school moved to a new campus and changed its name to Seymour High School.
P1000061 Upon the moving of Sheilds High School, the gym, and main school building which use to stand directly beside the gym were transformed into the new Sheilds Middle School. P1000058
The buildings remained in service to the community in this function until 1981 when the new Seymour Middle School opened.
P1000057 The main part of the Sheilds High School was demolished in 1998. P1000062
The gymnasium remains standing on 6th Street to this very day.
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Brookside Elementary School — Sullivan County, Tennessee

Brookside Elementary School was located in the Bloomingdale community of Sullivan County, Tennessee just north of Kingsport.
Former Brookside School -- Bloomingdale, Tennessee Sullivan County has been prone to school consolidation over the past several years. These consolidations have not came because of declining population, but mostly due to annexation by the city of Kingsport. In 2009 this specific community, Bloomingdale had 5 schools operating as part of the Sullivan County schools. Now there is one elementary school (K-8) and one high school which itself has became center of consolidation discussions for the better part of the past decade. Former Brookside School -- Bloomingdale, TN
When Brookside closed at the end of the 2011/12 school year there were 233 students enrolled. Those students were moved to Ketron Elementary a couple of miles away the following year.
Former Brookside School -- Bloomingdale, TN

Gem Theatre — Cairo, Illinois

Cairo, Illinois (March 2017) The Gem Theatre opened its doors in 1910, and seated 685.
A fire in 1934 completely gutted the theatre, and it was rebuilt two years later in Art Deco style, including a new, elegant marquee.
Cairo, Illinois (March 2017) The Gem Theatre continued to operate for nearly another half century, before it was closed in 1978. On January 26, 1979 the Cairo Historic District, including the Gem Theater was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Sadly, many of the buildings included in that district have fallen to the wrecking ball in the last 5-10 years.

Cairo, Illinois (2012)
The Gem Theatre as seen in March 2012

As you can see from the pictures above, the last 5 years has not been particularly kind to the Gem Theatre. As buildings surrounding it have fallen to the wrecking ball, a giant tree now grows out of the side, bursting through the brick wall of the Gem.

Cairo, Illinois (March 2017)
The Gem Theatre and the giant tree that is breaking through the side wall (March 2017)

Booker T Washington School — Hopkinsville, Kentucky

The Booker T Washington School is located on Second Street and until 1922 was named the Jackson Street School.
Booker T Washington Elementary -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky
Following integration of local public schools, Booker T. Washington housed classes for several programs, including middle school students, Head Start and adult literacy. The building has been vacant for about 15 years.
Booker T Washington Elementary -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky
In early 2010 a fire damaged an entire wing of the school and in March of that year that secion of the school was demolished.
Booker T Washington Elementary -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky
Booker T Washington Elementary -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky

Crispus-Attucks High School — Hopkinsville, Kentucky

Former Attucks School -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky Crispus-Attucks High School is located on First Street near the center of the city of Hopkinsville in Christian County, Kentucky. The school was the first high school serving students of color in all of Christian and even parts of Trigg County when it opened on October 28, 1916.
Former Attucks School -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky

In 1938, the Hopkinsville Colored Graded School system was absorbed into the white Hopkinsville Independent Schools, and the consolidated, yet segregated school system assumed ownership of Attucks High School. In 1956-1957, the Board of Education of the Hopkinsville Independent School System expanded the site and the campus through the acquisition of adjoining lots. Seven residential lots to the north and to the east of the original structure were purchased to provide land for a large classroom and gymnasium addition.
Former Attucks School -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky Completed in 1957, this two-story 39,747-square foot addition was constructed to the east of the original building and exemplifies the Modern architectural traditions of the 1950s with its curtain wall system and metal cladding on the exterior. Former Attucks School -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky Attucks High School held its final commencement ceremony on May 29, 1967.  Upon closing as a high school and integration with other schools in the Hopkinsville area, the Attucks building was transformed into Attucks Middle School, a school for fifth and sixth graders, which it served as until the end of the 1987-88 school year. The Christian County Board of Education retained ownership of the site until 1998 when fire and water damage and the presence of hazardous materials led them to seek a new owner for the structure. A group of interested alumni of the high school formed the Crispus Attucks Community Association in 1998 and subsequently purchased the property for $1.00. The C.A.C.A. maintains ownership of the property, and the group is dedicated to the restoration of the building as a multifunctional resource that can serve as a cultural centerpiece for the entire community. Former Attucks School -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky
On June 1, 2012 paperwork was submitted for the Attucks High School building and grounds to be added to the National Register of Historic Places. The grounds and school were approved to be added to the list and added to the list on January 23, 2013.
Former Attucks School -- Hopkinsville, Kentucky
Effords are still underway by community members and several groups to full restore this historic building and return it to serving the public.

McClure High School — Alexander County, Illinois

DSCN0436 McClure (population approximately 200) is located in Alexander County near Cape Girardeau, Missouri. McClure sits about a mile southeast of the Mississippi River on Illinois Route 3. The Old Prairie Creek flows through the center of McClure. The area was first settled in 1836 and a post office there was named “Clear Creek Landing”. The town was later officially recognized and the name changed to “Wheatland” in 1887. The name of the town was changed to McClure in 1895 in honor of a man named J.T. McClure.

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In 1938, McClure High School was built through an effort by the Public Works Administration. The school districts of McClure, Wolf Lake and Grand Tower consolidated around the mid-1950’s into the Shawnee School District. After the three districts merged the high school waslocated in Wolf Lake in Union County. McClure then became an elementary school.
DSCN0438 In September of 2013, after nearly 10 years of pushed back plans, ground was broken on a new Shawnee Consolidated Elementary School and McClure which had been operating as Shawnee Elementary School-South would close at the end of the 2012-13 school year. DSCN0440
When the school closed it was home to 76 students in grades Kindergarten through 4th.