North Carolina Capitol Building

North Carolina Capital Building -- Raleigh, North Carolina Located on Union Square at One East Edenton Street in the city of Raleigh, the cornerstone for this building was laid in 1833. Construction continued until 1840. North Carolina Capital Building -- Raleigh, North Carolina
It was designed primarily by the architectural firm of Ithiel Town and Alexander Jackson Davis.
North Carolina Capital Building -- Raleigh, North Carolina The Capitol housed the entire state government until 1888, and the North Carolina General Assembly met in the capitol building until 1963 when the legislature relocated to its current location in the North Carolina State Legislative Building. The offices of the state Lieutenant Governor were situated in the capitol building continuously until 1969, when the Lieutenant Governor relocated to the Hawkins-Hartness House a few blocks away on North Blount Street. North Carolina Capital Building -- Raleigh, North Carolina
The current Lieutenant Governor has reoccupied an office in the capitol building. The North Carolina Supreme Court has also convened in the building in the past, most recently meeting in the capitol’s old senate chamber in 2005 while the Supreme Court Building was undergoing renovations. The Governor and the governor’s immediate staff has continued to occupy offices in the building.
North Carolina Capital Building -- Raleigh, North Carolina
The Capitol was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 20, 1970.

Elizabethton Covered Bridge — Carter County, Tennessee

The Elizabethton Covered Bridge was constructed in 1882 and connects 3rd Street and Hattie Avenue in the Carter County Tennessee town.
Elizabethton, Tennessee The bridge spans 134 feet across the Doe River, a tributary of the Watauga River. Elizabethton, Tennessee
As the county seat, Elizabethton grew throughout the 19th century. However, Lynn Mountain hemmed it in to the east and the Watauga River lay to the north. The Doe River flooded often and limited growth to the south. To span westward, to the site of the current downtown, the city would need a bridge over the Doe River. After extensive debate, in 1882 the Carter County Court approved $3,000 for the bridge and $300 for approaches. The court appointed a committee to select a site for the bridge. However, the committee encountered an unexpected problem — the men could not find a qualified contractor to erect the bridge.
Elizabethton, Tennessee After county officials were unable to find a bridge contractor, a local doctor, E.E. Hunter, accepted the contract and hired experienced people to work on the bridge. Hunter selected Thomas Matson, who had been an engineer for the narrow gauge Tweetsie Railroad as an engineer and architect. Hunter referred to the bridge as his “five dollar bridge” since he made a profit of $5 as contractor. Elizabethton, Tennessee
Although logs from a lumber operation and a barn were thrown against the covered bridge and its supports during a disastrous flood in 1901, this was the only major bridge in the area to survive.

The bridge and immediate area were added to the National Register of Historic Places as the Historic Elizabethton District on March 14, 1973.
Elizabethton, Tennessee Today the bridge is closed to all motor vehicle traffic but pedestrians and bike riders are welcome. In recent months the bridge and neighboring river front park has been a popular Pokestop for Pokemon Go players. Elizabethton, Tennessee

Impossible Project Color Frames Color Set

One of my favorite types of the Polaroid 600 film sold by Impossible Project is the Color Frame Color Film.  I am really happy with the way these photos turned out.  I am slowly tweaking my techniques and realizing what works and what doesn’t with the Polaroid 600 camera and Impossible Project Film.  There is about as much science that goes into using this film as there is photography ideas.  Enjoy.
Color Frame Impossible Project 600
Huntington Park Beach, Newport-News, Virginia

Color Frame Impossible Project 600Colonial Williamsburg Courthouse — Williamsburg, Virginia

Color Frame Impossible Project 600Governor’s Palace — Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia

Color Frame Impossible Project 600Abandoned Grocery Store, Richmond, Virginia

Color Frame Impossible Project 600Shopping Center United States Post Office, Richmond, Virginia

Color Frame Impossible Project 600Catsburg Country Store near Durham, North Carolina

Color Frame Impossible Project 600Dairy King, Black Mountain, North Carolina

Color Frame Impossible Project 600

Betty Howard Coal Miner’s Memorial Theater –Harlan County, Kentucky

The Betty Howard Coal Miner’s Memorial Theater is located in the town of Benham, Kentucky in northern Harlan County.  Benham is a former company town built by Wisconsin Steel subsidiary International Harvester in the 1910s and 1920s.
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The theater was built by the coal company in 1921. Over the years as with many coal company towns, the theater and other buildings fell into disrepair. Benham, however is a great success story of preservation and rejuvenation. On July 21, 1983 the theater along with most of the other buildings surviving in Benham were placed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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That includes the theater. The town sought for private funding to restore the theater. In December of 2006 the theater was re-dedicated.

Alton Lennon Federal Building — Wilmington, North Carolina

This building was used as the outside of the courthouse on seasons 7-9 of the tv series Matlock.

Alton Lennon Federal Building -- Wilmington, NC

The Alton Lennon Federal Building is located near the center of Wilmington (New Hanover County) North Carolina.  It was designed by the Office of the Supervising Architect under James A. Wetmore and built between 1916 and 1919. It is an imposing three-story,Classical Revival style light sandstone building. It consists of a central mass with balanced projecting wings having engaged pedimented porticos. The design of the front facade of the earlier 1840s customs house is incorporated into the projecting wings to the cast iron details. The building measures 332 feet by 113 feet.  The building was named for U.S. Congressman and Senator Alton Lennon  in 1976. This building was used as the outside of the courthouse on seasons 7-9 of the tv series Matlock.

The building was placed on the Nation Register of Historic Places in 1974

Morristown College — Morristown, Tennessee

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Morristown College was an African American higher education institution located in Morristown, Tennessee.
Morristown College -- Morristown, Tennessee The school was founded in 1881 by the national Freedman’s Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The school was renamed Knoxville College-Morristown Campus in 1989 and closed in 1994. Prior to the civil rights movement, the college held the distinction of being one of only two institutions in East Tennessee for African Americans, the other being Knoxville College, founded in 1875.

Morristown College -- Morristown, Tennessee
Laura Yard Hill Hall  (Built in 1911  Damaged by arson in 2010)

The 52-acre campus is up on a hill in the middle of Morristown.

Seven of the college’s nine buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the college buildings have fallen into disrepair, with vandalism and deteriorating facades.
Morristown College -- Morristown, Tennessee
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Another building, Kenwood Refectory, was burned in 2008, due to arson.   The following are pictures from across what remains of the campus of Morristown College.
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Muscle Shoals Sound Studio — Muscle Shoals, Alabama

Checked another item off my bucket list this morning and saw the original Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Muscle Shoals, Alabama.
Muscle Shoals Sound Studio
The following information is taken from the wikipedia page for the sound studio:

Muscle Shoals Sound Studio was formed in Sheffield, Alabama, in 1969 when a group of four session musicians called The Swampers decided to leave the nearby FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals to create their own recording set-up.

The four, Barry Beckett (keyboards), Roger Hawkins (drums), Jimmy Johnson (guitar) and David Hood(bass), then became known as The Muscle Shoals Sound Rhythm Section and were the first rhythm section to own a studio and eventually run their own publishing and production companies. Their backing and arrangements have been heard on many recordings, including major hits from Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, and the Staple Singers, but a wide range of artists in popular music recorded hit songs and complete albums at the studio. They are referred to as “the Swampers” in the lyrics of “Sweet Home Alabama” byLynyrd Skynyrd.

The group first came together in 1967 and initially played sessions in New York and Nashville, as well as on recordings made at Rick Hall’s FAME facility. The initial successes in soul and R&B led to the arrival at the Muscle Shoals Sound studios of more mainstream rock and pop performers, including The Rolling Stones, Traffic, Elton John, Boz Scaggs,Willie Nelson, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, Dr. Hook, Elkie Brooks, Millie Jackson, Julian Lennon and Glenn Frey.

The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on June 2, 2006.

 

 

Southern Railway Depot — Wilkes County, North Carolina

The Southern Railway Depot, also known as the North Wilkesboro Depot, is located  along Cherry Street, CBD Loop and Ninth Street.
North Wilkesboro Depot -- North Wilkesboro, NC
It was built in 1914 by the Southern Railway, and is a long, one-story brick building with American Craftsman style design elements. It measures 36 feet wide and 240 feet long and has a low hipped roof with overhanging eaves. Passenger service ceased in 1955.
North Wilkesboro Depot -- North Wilkesboro, NC
It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on September 10, 2004.

WilkesboroTrain1

Allardt First Presbyterian Church

The church was constructed in 1903 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 3, 1991.

 

Allardt

The Allardt First Presbyterian Church is a Gothic Revival style building located on Pennsylvania Avenue in Allardt, (Fentress County) Tennessee.

allardt

The church was constructed in 1903 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 3, 1991.

Old Burke County Courthouse — Burke County, North Carolina

BurkeCo

The Burke County Courthouse is located at 102 East Union Street Morganton, North Carolina.

MorgantonCourthouse5

In 1830, the Burke County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions decided that the County needed a new courthouse to replace the “shabby, weather-beaten” plank courthouse that had been built on the public square in 1791. The General Assembly of 1830-31 authorized it to spend $8,000 and named five commissioners to oversee the construction. In the 1832-33 sessions, the General Assembly increased the amount to $12,000.

MorgantonCourthouse3
The Courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 17, 1970

James Binnie, a Scottish builder, was awarded the contract in 1833.  He built the courthouse of native stone quarried on the Forney plantation about four miles north of Morganton. Frederick Roderick, a German stonemason who later established his home in Burke County, assisted Mr. Binnie with the construction.  The building was put into use in 1837.

MorgantonCourthouse

From 1847 until 1862, the North Carolina Supreme Court held its August session in the courthouse for the convenience of lawyers from the western part of the state who were arguing appeals from the Superior Courts of their respective counties.

MorgantonCourthouse2

During the Civil War, on April 17, 1865, Major General George Stoneman occupied the building and destroyed most of the County’s records.

MorgantonCourthouse4

In 1885, the exterior of the building was covered with stucco, and in 1903, a major renovation designed by architect Frank Milburn of Columbia, SC raised the porticos and replaced the simple classical cupola with an elaborate one of Baroque style, giving the courthouse its present appearance.

MorgantonCourthouse1

A monument to Burke County’s Confederate Army troops was erected on the northwest corner of the Square in 1911 and was paid for by public subscription.  The bronze statue of the soldier was added in 1918. The statue was a gift from Captain William Joseph Kincaid, a Burke County Confederate soldier, who settled in Griffin, Georgia after the war.

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Also found on the Square is a memorial rose garden given in memory of Bob Byrd (1930-2001), a prominent Burke County attorney and a statue of Sam J. Ervin, Jr., a Burke County native, who served in the US Senate from 1954 to 1974.

The courthouse was in continuous use until 1976 when the present Burke County Courthouse was completed.  The effort to preserve the Old Courthouse began in 1978. The  restoration, completed in 1984, was accomplished with the joint efforts of Burke County, the City of Morganton, and Historic Burke Foundation.

The North Carolina Supreme Court met in the Old Chowan County Courthouse in Edenton in 2004, and again in 2013. In 2015, Governor McCrory signed Senate Bill 161 into law (S.L. 2015-89), allowing the court to meet in Morganton once again, “…the court shall meet in the Old Burke County Courthouse, the location of summer sessions of the Supreme Court from 1847-1862.” After 154 years the court will once again hold session in the Historic Courthouse in 2016.