The State Theatre — Logansport, Indiana

The State Theatre is located at 321 East Market Street in Logansport, Indiana.
The theatre opened on June 8, 1940 with 1,074 seats. A second screen was later added, and operated as a movie theatre into late 2008.
State Theater -- Logansport, Indiana
The State is now a live performance venue

Louisville’s Forgotten Mall

Mid-City Mall -- Louisville, KY
Photo credit:  University of Louisville Photo Archives

Mid City Mall -- Louisville, Kentucky When I was little I liked to study maps. I can remember getting the big giant road atlas out and just studying, looking, making notes. Of course living in small town Kentucky, Louisville, the largest city in my home state was often a source of obsession. When thinking back to those maps, Jefferson, Mall St Matthews, and Oxmoor Center, they were all there. Mid City Mall was never mentioned, and being on Bardstown Road, I honestly dont know that I was ever in that part of town until I was a grown man. Mid City Mall -- Louisville, Kentucky Before I dive more into the pictures let me give a little history.

Mid City Mall was built on the site of the German Protestant Orphan’s Home, which was founded in 1851 and moved to the 10-acre Highlands site in 1902. It remained there until 1962, but the structure and grounds were sold for $500,000 in 1959 to mall developers. The aging structure was demolished and the orphanage moved to Bardstown Road and Goldsmith Lane. Developers then built what became Kentucky’s second enclosed mall. The initial plan, unveiled in 1958, called for a $7.5 million, five-story mall with a pool in front on the Bardstown Road side and penthouse apartments on the top floor. The plan was gradually whittled down to a one-story plan with a lower level. The main developer of the project was Guy E. McGaughey, Jr., an attorney from Lawrenceville, Ill. The concept of an enclosed mall was very new. There were only a handful of enclosed malls in the US at the time. In drawing up the business model for the Mall, Mr. McGaughey had no basis for the rents. There was not a history for how much to charge the tenants for space, maintenance, housekeeping, repairs, trash pick-up, etc. Consequently, revenues were never enough to keep the Mall up-to-date and clean. Construction began in March 1962 and the mall was completed in October of that year at a cost of $3 million. The shopping center formally opened on October 10, 1962, in a ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by Louisville Mayor William O. Cowger and Jefferson County Judge Marlow Cook. The mall contained 180,000 square feet of leasable space and 22 stores. On June 21, 1964 an early morning fire that started in the Cherokee Book and Card Stop caused $200,000 in damage to the mall.

Mid City Mall -- Louisville, Kentucky

There was also a Kresge store in this mall that held its grand opening in October of 1962. Mid City Mall -- Louisville, Kentucky
The mall originally opened with Winn-Dixe supermarket.  When Winn-Dixie pulled out of the Louisville market in 2004, Buehler’s, a chain based in Jasper, Indiana, (not to be confused with the chain of the same name based in Ohio). Amid financial difficulties Buehler’s filed for bankruptcy in 2005 and closed both Louisville stores. The space was quickly taken over by Valu Market, a local Louisville area chain. Valu Market remains there today.

The mall is basically an elongated square on two floors.  The bottom floor was once home to a skating rink.  Today the mall is home to many non traditional mall tennants including a comedy club, doctors offices,  and a branch of the Louisville Public Library.
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Mid City Mall -- Louisville, Kentucky
In 2015 it was announced that the mall would recieve renovations and new tennants. Today the mall is full and renovations have been completed.
Mid City Mall -- Louisville, KY

May 2017 Indiana/Ohio Road Trip: Day 2

These crazy road trips where I bounce back and forth between a couple of states and drive several hundred miles a day hurt a little more than they use to. Today wasnt hardly as many miles as yesterday: 320. I started out the day in Logansport, Indiana. First on my agenda was to check out the mall right across the street from my hotel. The only stores in this mall are Dunham’s Sports and JC Penney. The JC Penney is closing next month. I was impressed with the mall management keeping the fountain going and even putting fake wooden ducks in it haha.
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There has been a lot of talk that this mall will close soon and be demolished for the land to be redeveloped.
The next stop was Peru, Indiana where I went to the tiniest Kmart ever. Ill post pictures of that later.

After Peru, I drove down to Marion to explore the Five Points Mall. Much to my surprise there was a carnival set up in the parking lot and that was really cool.
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This mall is anchored by Carsons and Roses. It was originally anchored by Carsons, Hills, JC Penney and Sears. The JC Penney and Sears are empty, the Hills is now Roses.
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A couple of Goodwills later and lunch at some place called the root beer stand and I was on my way to the second Kmart of the day; Gas City, Indiana. This store is a perfect mirrored image layout of the store that was at Village Center Mall in Harlan. Auto Center and all.

After this it gets fuzzy. I started getting tired and just put the address of an abandoned Sears in Trotwood, Ohio in the GPS. I do remember going through Muncie and Richmond.
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Former Sears -- Trotwood, Ohio//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
ALl that remains of the old Salem Mall in Trotwood just north of Dayton.
I explored a few more things and was in the hotel room by 6. An early evening should recharge my batteries. A lot is on tap for tomorrow, I’ll need it.

May 2017 Indiana/Ohio Road Trip: Day 1

Meadow Lake Wind Farm
4:30 came so early this morning.  So early in fact I rolled back over and slept until 5.  In doing that I had to leap out of bed when my alarm went off and leave as quickly as possible.  I was out the door and on the road by about 5:20. The grand total for the day was 485 miles. That 485 miles included 2 new Kmart stores, a mall in Louisville on Bardstown Road that I didnt even know existed, my customary stop at the Falls of the Ohio River State Park in Clarksville, Indiana, 2 Goodwill Outlets, 1 regular Goodwill store, Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis, and the Meadow Lake Wind Farm off I65 near Chalmers. Ill give another update tomorrow with a few more pictures from the day. Enjoy and thanks for reading!
Louisville, Kentucky Kmart -- Thompson Rd -- Indianapolis, IN
Indianapolis, Indiana Indianapolis, Indiana

Martin’s Fork Time Machine

First and foremost before I begin this entry I want to give credit and thanks to the Martins Fork Lake Facebook page for sharing these photos. Ever since I was small I have always wondered what the land looked like before the lake was built at Smith. So, with great gratitude I thank the folks who control the lake’s social media page for having the thoughtfulness and courtesy to share these wonderful archives with us.

 
Martins Fork Lake Construction (Mid-Late 1970s) Im starting off the photos with what I consider to be the holy grail of the bunch. This photo is looking toward the bridge nearest the beach. Imagine that little road running up and down the middle is the road along the beach area. If you look closely you can see the roof of the old Smith School and the rock church near the center. Im shocked at how flat this area was. Martins Fork Lake Construction (Mid-Late 1970s)
This second picture is looking off toward the lake from the last bridge. In fact, to this day, if the water is down far enough you can still tell where this bridge was that is in the picture.
Martins Fork Lake Construction (Mid-Late 1970s) The rest of the photos are pretty self explanatory, but fascinating no doubt. Martins Fork Lake Construction (Mid-Late 1970s)

The last picture is an old welcome sign that was at the lake until the 1980s according to the lake’s Facbook page.
Martins Fork Lake Construction (Mid-Late 1970s)

I also have a couple of other entries that includes more historical pictures from Martins Fork Lake and the Smith community that I posted a few years ago, if you are interested in reading those articles you can do so by clicking  the links below:

Smith Kentucky; A Glimpse To The Past, Present and Futrue

Smith Presbyterian Church

Logan County Courthouse — Russellville, Kentucky

Logan County Courthouse -- Russellville, KY
This Logan County Courthouse was constructed in 1903 and remodeled in 1972. This courthouse replaced earlier courthouses dating back to 1792 that were located at the site of the current day public square in town.

Sue Bennett College (CLOSED) — London, Kentucky

Sue Bennett College was a private college located in the southeastern Kentucky town of  London in Laurel County.  The school first opened in 1897 as an elementary school.
Sue Bennett College -- London, Kentucky In 1922 the school became a junior college and recieved accredidation. The school remained affiliated with the United Methodist Church throughout its operation. Sue Bennett College -- London, Kentucky
In 1991 a new president was elected who pushed for the expansion of athletic programs and a business degree program. The new programs and atheletic offerings were implemented in hopes of increasing enrollment, but that never materialzed and the college fell into debt.
Sue Bennett College -- London, Kentucky After many financial and legal problems on September 22, 1997 the acredidation was stripped from the college. Sue Bennett College -- London, Kentucky
By October 6th the United States Department of Education imposed an emergency action against Sue Bennett College, issuing a Notice of Intent to Terminate the institution from participation in the federal student financial assistance programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965. The college requested a hearing to appeal that proceeding. The appeal was based on SBC’s pending litigation versus the Eastern District of Kentucky to have the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools reinstate its accreditation. However, Judge Richard I. Slippen rejected SBC’s request, and thus the possibility of continued federal financial assistance was dead, as was hopes of remaining open. Upon further research for this article I discovered the college was sold in 2014.  Until that time it had been used for community college and Union College classes.  The link to the article announcing its sale can be found by clicking HERE.  Further reading can be found on my friends blog at abandonedonline by clicking HERE