Rule High School — Knoxville, Tennessee

Rule High School -- Knoxville, TN Rule High School opened in 1927. It was named after Captain William Rule, a former Union Army captain who went on to be mayor of Knoxville and the editor of the Knoxville Journal. Rule High School -- Knoxville, TN
Rule High School -- Knoxville, TN//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
Rule High School -- Knoxville, TN//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
The first addition was finished in 1949, and the second addition was completed in the 1970s.
Rule High School -- Knoxville, TN
However, the school closed in 1991 due to low enrollment numbers.

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Monday morning I was able to take a few minutes and finally stop by and explore a nearly vacant mall in Middletown, Ohio.
Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio I had passed by this mall many times but had never taken the time to actually go inside and experience it. I’m glad I did, because from the looks of things, this mall might not be around next holiday season. Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio
The Towne Mall Galleria is located on Towne Boulevard in the Warren County portion of Middletown, in the section of the city referred to as the Renaissance District near the Ohio 122-Interstate 75 interchange. The more than 465,000-square-foot mall first opened in 1977, although the malls earliest roots can be traced several years earlier.
Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio Burlington -- Middletown, Ohio
The first store to open on the property was, a 1-level (113,300 square foot), Cincinnati-based McAlpin’s. McAlpin’s opened for business on February 16, 1975. The remainder of the shopping hub was added to this freestanding anchor. The mall, and a 68,000 square foot Sears, opened February 9, 1977. Later that year the mall was complete when Elder-Beerman opened a 118,000 square foot opened on the mall’s west side.
Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio In August 1998, McAlpin’s became Dillard’s as part of a merger. Dillard’s would remain open here until June 2008, when they closed their doors. This, along with multiple failed renovation plans and rejuvination attempts by the mall’s owner CBL and Associates, lead to many smaller inline closings by the mid-2000s. Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio
In 2015 Burlington and Gabe’s opened in the former Dillard’s anchor spot, although they do not have direct access to the interior corridor.
Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio
Unfortunately, the grand openings of these stores was met with bad tidings. Elder-Beerman shuttered their 39-year-old store on January 31, 2017.
Former Elder-Beerman -- Middletown Sears, another charter 1977 tenant, went dark in September of the same year. Former Sears -- Middletown, Ohio
Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio If my calculations are correct, today there are less than 10 businesses open at the mall. Those include: –Burlington –Gabe’s –Roger’s Jewelers (Currently Closing) Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio
–Planet Fitness
— Cincinnati Nails
–My Salon
–Sell Gold
Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio As you can see the directory is terribly out of date. Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio
Towne Mall Galleria -- Middletown,  Ohio

Old Rosemont School — Bristol, Tennessee

This building served as the Rosemont Elementary on Bristol, Tennessee’s north side from 1930 until the early 1980s. The three story building was constructed in 1929 and consists of 32,640 square feet.
Former Rosemont Elementary - Bristol,  TN Once this building was replaced by the local school district it was sold to the Tri Cities Christian School which operated here from 1984 until 2009. Former Rosemont Elementary - Bristol,  TN
Since 2009 the building has sporadically served as a community center. More often though, the building has been the subject of vandals.
Former Rosemont Elementary - Bristol,  TN The building is currently for sale. Former Rosemont Elementary - Bristol,  TN

Sadieville Elementary School — Scott County, Kentucky

Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky
Since starting this blog  in 2014, I have covered nearly 80 abandoned school buildings in 9 states stretching from Eastern North Carolina to the banks of the Mississippi River in Cairo, Illinois.  Today, while researching for my newest entry covering the Sadieville School in northern Scott County, (Kentucky), I came across something I had yet to find in the reason a school was closed.  Enrollment was getting too high.  90% of the schools I have visited have been closed due to the opposite, declining enrollment.

I always thought it was rather odd that a school in the fastest growing county in the entire state would be closed and abandoned.   In 1984-85 Sadieville was home to 150 students.  By 1988 that number had jumped to 245.

The Scott County School System decided to build a larger, more modern facility to serve northern Scott County located about 5 miles south of Sadieville.   Construction was swift and by March 5, 1990, Sadieville was closed and it’s students and staff had moved to their new school, Northern Elementary.
Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky The last 28 years have not been kind to the campus. The grounds are overgrown, the front of the building is almost covered by brush and trees that have popped up.  But considering the building is closing in on being 100 years old, its still standing and relatively structurally sound once you take out of consideration the roof and especially the gymnasium area.Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky The school has obviously been used as a storage building but has now fallen victim to faulty ceilings and vandalism. Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky
Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky
I dont know if there were any windows that were still fully intact.
Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky
Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky Sadieville School -- Scott County, Kentucky

Big Creek Elementary — Perry County, Kentucky

Its rather odd to find three school districts who border each other have a school by the same name in all three. That was the case in Clay, Leslie and Perry County Kentucky until several years ago. I have already covered the closed Big Creek Elementary School in Leslie County in this blog. That school closed several years ago. The school covered in this entry is the Big Creek Elementary that was located in Perry County.
Big Creek Elementary School -- Hazard, Kentucky The school is located near the intersection of Kentucky 80 and Kentucky 1096 in the community of Avawam about 8 miles west of Hazard near the Perry/Leslie County line. Big Creek Elementary School -- Hazard, Kentucky
Big Creek Elementary was closed in 2014 due to declining enrollment and a planned consolidation of schools in Perry County. At the end of the 2013-14 school year Big Creek was home to 136 students in grades K-8.
Big Creek Elementary School -- Hazard, Kentucky Big Creek Elementary School -- Hazard, Kentucky

The Old Cannon Memorial Hospital — Banner Elk, North Carolina

Old Cannon Hospital  -- Banner Elk, NC The old Charles A. Cannon, Jr. Memorial Hospital is located just outside downtown Banner Elk, North Carolina. The hospital was built in 1962 and replaced Grace Hospital III, which was opened in 1932. Old Cannon Hospital  -- Banner Elk, NC
The building has been sitting vacant since 1999 when the hospital merged with a neighboring hospital in nearby Linville.
Old Cannon Hospital  -- Banner Elk, NC Old Cannon Hospital  -- Banner Elk, NC

Old Cannon Hospital  -- Banner Elk, NC The pictures including in this article thus far were all taken on July 31, 2017. The following pictures were taken in the fall of 2012. As you can see, the building has definitely had a rough five years. Old Cannon Hospital (2012) -- Banner Elk, NC
Old Cannon Hospital (2012) -- Banner Elk, NC

Former Hara Arena (1956-2016) — Trotwood, Ohio

Hara Arena was a 5,500-seat multi-purpose arena located in the Dayton, Ohio suburb of Trotwood. The facility began as a ballroom in 1956, added an arena in 1964 and eventually grew to a six-building complex.
Hara Arena -- Trotwood, Ohio Over the course of its 60 year history Hara has been home to many sports teams including the Dayton Jets basketball team and Dayton Gems (1964–1977, 1979–1980 and 2009–2012), Dayton Blue Hawks, Dayton Owls, Dayton Bombers, Dayton Ice Bandits, Dayton Demonz, and Dayton Demolition ice hockey teams and the Marshals indoor football team.  Hara Arena -- Trotwood, Ohio
The original plans did not include an ice rink, but were changed to accommodate the Dayton Gems who were looking for a home arena. By the end of its life in 2016, the complex spanned 165,000 square feet which includes the main arena, four exhibition halls, a conference center, a pub and a golf course.
Hara Arena -- Trotwood, Ohio
On July 29, 2016, it was announced that the facility would close after hosting a final event August 27, 2016 due to ongoing financial issues and a 20-year long legal fight over the unresolved estate of founder Harold Wampler. At the time of the closure announcement, the facility was said to have a $36 million annual impact to the area. The closure forced events, like the annual Dayton Hamvention, to search for an alternative venue. It also forced the Dayton Demolition ice hockey team to cease operations after only one season.
Hara Arena -- Trotwood, Ohio