Mount Rogers Combined School — Grayson County, Virginia

Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia Mount Rogers combined school was located along US 58 near Whitetop, Virginia in Western Grayson County. The original part of the building was constructed in the 1930s. Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia
Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginiaight=”3456″ alt=”Former Mount Rogers School — Grayson County, Virginia”>
The building served grades K-12 and at the time of its closing was one of only 2 k-12 facilities left in the state.
Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia In the early 1950s the school recieved a major addition including a gymnasium and lunchroom.

Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia
Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia

The playground equipment remains on site and appears to be regularly used, probably by neighborhood children.
Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia
Former Mount Rogers School -- Grayson County, Virginia
The schools closing and consolidation was met with resistance of locals in the area worried about longer bus rides for children across curvy winding mountain roads.   Finally on August 10, 2010, Grayson Highlands School opened, leaving Mt Rogers Combined School closed and a part of Grayson County’s past.

Shady Valley Elementary — Johnson County, Tennessee

Shady Valley School is one of the few WPA school buildings still being utilized that I have came across in my travels.
Shady Valley Elementary -- Shady Valley, Tennessee The building was built in 1936.   Shady Valley Elementary -- Shady Valley, Tennessee
Today the school still serves around 50 students.
Shady Valley Elementary -- Shady Valley, Tennessee Shady Valley Elementary --Shady Valley, Tennessee
Shady Valley Elementary --  Shady Valley, Tennessee

Cumberland Mountain General Store — Fentress County, Tennessee

The Cumberland Mountain General Store in Clarkrange, Tennessee has became one of my favorite oddities that I have ran upon in recent years out on the road.

CumberlandMountain

The store is located about 19 miles north of Crossville on US 127.

ClarkRangeGeneralStore

Inside you will find everything from vintage license plates to classiv vinyl records to tacky bumper stickers.  (FYI this place loves rebel flags and duck dynastyesque merchandise)  In the back of the store you will find a true vintage 1950s soda fountain and believe me, this place was packed out.  customers ranging from what appeared to be local farmers, to men in suits to people like me who appeared to have been in the car all day.

ClarkRangeGeneralStore1

When researching this place and scoping it out to visit on my trip, I kept reading about their famous peanut butter fudge and other home made candies.  I had to try them.  They are definitely in the upper echelon  of candies that I have tried.  I highly recommend a stop inside the Cumberland Mountain store if you ever find yourself traveling through Clarkrange and Fentress County.

Allardt First Presbyterian Church

The church was constructed in 1903 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 3, 1991.

 

Allardt

The Allardt First Presbyterian Church is a Gothic Revival style building located on Pennsylvania Avenue in Allardt, (Fentress County) Tennessee.

allardt

The church was constructed in 1903 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 3, 1991.

Sandy Ridge 27406 — Stokes County, North Carolina

SandyRidge

Sandy Ridge North Carolina is located in northern Stokes County on state route 704 about 8 miles northeast of the county seat of Danbury.

Sandy Ridge NC

 

Hancock County Courthouse — Sneedville, Tennessee

The Hancock County Courthouse is located in the county seat of Sneedville. The Neoclassical courthouse was designed by Allen N. Dryden and built by the Emory Construction Company in 1931.

courthouse

Hancock County, Tennessee is located in the northeastern part of the state near the Virginia border.

Hancock County was created from parts of Hawkins and Claiborne counties. The act establishing the county was passed by the state legislature in 1844, but several Hawkins residents sued to block its creation. In 1848, the Tennessee Supreme Court ruled in favor of the new county. The county seat, Sneedville, was named in honor of attorney William H. Sneed, who represented the county in the court case. The county was named for Revolutionary War patriot John HancockHancockCounty

Hancock County covers a rugged part of the state over 222 square miles and is home to 6,657 people making it the fourth smallest county population wise and one of the smallest area wise as well.

The Hancock County Courthouse is located in the county seat of Sneedville.  The Neoclassical courthouse was  designed by Allen N. Dryden and built by the Emory Construction Company in 1931.

Mill Creek School — Grayson County, Virginia

Located at an elevation of about 3,200 feet high up in the Appalachian Mountains of Southwest Virginia’s Grayson County is what once was Mill Creek School.

screencapture-www-google-com-maps-d-edit-1447197390837

This school is located right on the northern side of what is now US 58, or the Highlands Parkway several miles east of the community of Mouth of Wilson Virginia.    From the looks of the previous picture I found on the Rugby, Virginia facebook page, dated 1953, at some point the school has been remodeled and had one side of the big windows replaced.  I believe this to have been a two room schoolhouse.

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                                                            Mill Creek School — Grayson County, Virginia — 1953

Like most counties around this area,the 1960s brought along progressive movements in rural education and these smaller schools were closed as larger more centrally located schools were built.

GraysonCO

Back in 2008 the school still appeared to be in fairly good shape.

front-classroom-boards

Sadly the quality ofi my pictures from this visit arent that great.  I think I had a 5 Megapixle Canon back then and on top of that these are saved from compressed photos that have been hanging out over on Myspace for 7 years.   I hope to go back by Mill Creek School sometime soon when I am traveling to North Carolina.  That way I can do an updated set of photos and really give this gem the attention it deserves.